Motherhood

Diaper Rash Woes

We slept over at the hubby’s relatives in Cainta last weekend. After a three-hour commute from our home, the little girl was already grumpy when we got there.

I decided to give her a sponge bath and a nappy change to lighten up her mood, but I wasn’t prepared for what I saw upon removing her diapers. Red, splotchy rashes. No wonder my little girl was in a foul mood.

You see, she’s never had them before. I have always made sure that I change her nappy every four hours, regardless of its contents. Poop-filled ones are a different story, of course.

I did not have any diaper raah cream at hand then. I never had the need for any, therefore I never bought any. We had to make do with first aid solutions for diaper rash. Good thing we were over at my in-laws, several experienced mothers helped me get through my ordeal.

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Their first choice was petroleum jelly. I was told to apply the jelly generously on the affected area with a q-tip (cotton buds). The next time I was changing my baby’s diapers, the rashes were long gone.

To prevent future occurences, I supplied myself with a tube of diaper rash cream. Drapolene, to be exact.

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It’s the brand I remember my cousins and niblings used as infants. Ergo, it’s probably effective. I now apply a little to my daughter’s diaper area every nappy change to prevent the recurrence of the nasty diaper rash.

In the absence of diaper rash creams and petroleum jelly, baby powder may be used. Powder absorbs moisture and keeps baby’s skin dry. Powder use should be minimal, though, as it poses potential danger when inhaled by your little one.

Frequent diaper changes also helps prevent diaper rash. When baby’s skin is not soaked in urine, it is unlikely to develop those nasty red splotches. Also, make sure that you give baby’s diaper area a thorough rinsing and drying everytime you change nappies for the same purpose.

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